Thursday, September 29, 2016

Composition Doll: Sonja


   Good Morning!  This is Sonja, she is a restored composition doll.  She dates from 1920-1930's.  Sonja has a cloth body and legs. Her arms are 3/4 length composition, and so is her head.

   There is no manufacturing mark on her.  So she probably is not an expensive doll, but when she arrived she had the traces of being much loved.


   This is all 16" of her, in her natural state.  I love the way her feet are made.  The circle in her chest is the "ma-ma" noise box.  It no longer works, so I removed it to prevent any more rusting on to the fabric.


   I sanded her head and arms and reprinted them.  Her nose was slightly damaged, but still intact!


    Sonja has a sweet disposition, and a twinkle in her eyes once again.  The dress she wears is a vintage one, I washed and sewed it to fit her properly.


   Sonja is wearing a blue bonnet I crocheted for her.  It matches the blue boots I painted on her feet with  added  little heart decoration on the side of each shoe.   She has white bloomers on to keep her modesty.

    Sonja is named after one of my sister-in-laws.   A very kind and dear lady.

          Happy Thursday!   Let's watch October come sweeping in!      Smile On!    Audrey
                                         

Friday, September 23, 2016

Vintage Baby Gowns



   Welcome to the nursery.  This is the room where I keep all of my restored dolls, reborns, and little orphans I have purchased at sales, and good-will shops.

   I recently decided to display the little white vintage baby dresses I have been acquiring.  I had seven of them in storage, waiting for the perfect dolls to use in the restoring process.  When I realized that they would make a nice showing, and then I could admire the little dears, too.


   Here are the five I have on this wall, behind the rocking chair.  They are made out of a soft some-what transparent fabric.  I put a paper slip under each one to help them hold their shape.


   They are all different styles, and have some lovely details, which are difficult to see in the photos.


   The one on the far left, has a smattering of embroidered flowers down the front, in pink and blue.


    Here are the other two dresses.  I am not sure when these dresses were popular.  1940's or 1950's would be my guess.  The one on the right is a very pale blue.  The little doll with the pink bow on the youth bed, is one of the lucky "restores" to be wearing a vintage dress and a sweater, too.

         As the weekend approaches, I hope you have time for rest, relaxing, and whatever your heart desires.
   
                                           Thanks for stopping in today!          :o)   Audrey

                                                       

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Dog Art


                                                               Happy Tuesday!

    Don't you just love those ads in the magazines of delightfully happy faced dogs?   I glued these in my art journal, and added the costumes.    Pure Fun!!

                                                                         Smile On!      Audrey

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Trudy Doll 1946


    There are days like this.  When you just feel like you need a good cry.   However, this little doll has choices as to how she wants to face the day.  


   Sometimes she just needs a much needed nap!   When you're 70 years old, that could be just what is needed!  This little doll was made in 1946.  She is a "3-in-1 Trudy" doll.


   If you turn a knob on top of her head, she will show you this little smile, and a twinkle in her eyes!


    This little sweetie was in need of a make over.  A mechanical problem needed to be addressed with the mechanism that made her head turn smoothly to show the three expressions.


    A make-over, and a new hairdo, based on the character Pebbles from the Flintstones cartoon.  She also looks a little like Tinkerbell, now.   She is quite pleased with the "new" do!  Her costume is made from a pair of socks I bought on a whim, just because they were so cute, and fuzzy.  The socks make a cuddly outfit.



   Trudy still takes frequent naps, after all, she is 70 years old.   The woman that created her, an Elsie Gilbert,  designed this doll for a company called "Sleepy, Weepy, Smiley".  A trademark of Three in One Doll Corporation.  In this photo you can see the knob on top of her head that is used to turn the faces.  She measures 14" tall.


                                         Hope your day is filled with smiles and hugs!!

                                                                       Smile On!      Audrey

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Mmm-Mmm Good!


    If you look closely, this little face may look vaguely familiar.   This is the Campbell Soup Kid, dating from 1910.  The doll is based on a character created by Grace Drayton.  Grace was the illustrator of a comic character called Dolly Dingle, and there is a strong similarity between Dolly and the Campbells Soup Kids.


    The doll measures about 12", and is stuffed with crushed cork.  In 1910, this was considered a "new" material to use in dolls.  It sure held up, and kept the doll in good shape for 106 years!   The composition of her hands had deteriorated so badly I replaced them with another set of the same era.  Doll parts saved from other projects can be a life line for the broken and desperate!


       This doll was well loved over the years, but her joyful expressive face was still very much intact!


    There was evidence of her shoes, but the color was completely faded away.  New shoes were needed!


    I freshened her up with acrylic paint, and designed these lovely high tops for her dainty little feet.



    Viola, is all cute and adorable once again.  I am so grateful her head was made from such a strong material.  She didn't need any patching.   I repainted her with acrylic paint, and she looks nearly new.


       This cute little character was used for advertising the Campbells Soup for many years, eventually becoming an American icon.   The doll was sculpted by another female artist, Helen Trowbridge.   I named her Viola, as that was the first name of her creator, Viola Grace Drayton.

    As the leaves begin to turn, ever so slightly, here in northern Wisconsin, it reminds me that the cupboard shelf needs to be restocked with good-ol' soup once again!!  

                                                                               Smile On!        Audrey